Brexit

Why a ‘no deal’ Brexit could turn up the heat on energy bills for homeowners

Why a ‘no deal’ Brexit could turn up the heat on energy bills for homeowners

A ‘no deal’ Brexit will likely result in inflated energy bills for homeowners next winter, warn experts from smart central heating provider, Genius Hub.

According to Alasdair Woodbridge, CEO at Genius Hub, uncertainty surrounding the strength of the pound is just one of many reasons that could see some people struggle to keep their homes warm next winter.

Other factors, irrespective of currency fluctuations, include:

Increased transportation and importation costs

Ambiguity surrounding green energy initiative targets 

Lack of investment in Britain’s energy infrastructure from the EU

Whether Britain will remain in the EU’s Emissions Trading Scheme after 2020

The B Word

The B Word

Regardless of your views on Brexit, there’s no arguing that it has created a great deal of uncertainty.  Reuben John from Fine & Country East London discusses what this means for the property market.

As the final Brexit decision edges closer, the impact on the property market has left potential sellers and buyers in a difficult position because of the uncertain outcome. On the one hand, there is a wait and see attitude, particularly with buyers thinking that prices may well reduce. For sellers, the question is if the market slows down is selling now the better option?

Invest in Manchester for returns heading North

Manchester skyline

Manchester, once famous for flat caps and post-industrial decline, has in recent decades reinvented itself. Home to two of the greatest football teams on earth and a significant media and technology sector - Manchester has become Northern England's answer to London, and property values in the city reflect this.

Residential property price growth in Manchester - driven by significant public and private investment, an ongoing lack of housing supply, a significant student population and the return of city centre living - has outperformed the UK average with annual average growth of 4.2%, compared with a UK average of 2.4%.

Prices, Demand, and Supply All in Decline as Brexit Uncertainty Persists

Prices, Demand, and Supply All in Decline as Brexit Uncertainty Persists

In October, the fall in interest from new buyers has led to a more negative trend in house prices, according to the latest RICS UK Residential Market Survey. While the regional picture remains varied, respondents are also doubtful that UK sales momentum will pick-up over the coming months.

In the October survey, 10% more respondents saw a fall in prices at the headline level. (-2% net balance previously). This is the weakest reading since September 2012, and mostly stems from London and the South East, with the price balance in the South East deteriorating during October. East Anglia, the South West and the North East also saw negative price balances, but prices continue to rise in other parts of the UK, with the strongest growth in Northern Ireland and Scotland.

First-time buyers drive housing boom

First-time buyers drive housing boom

House prices have hit record levels with sales in the housing sector hitting a 10-year high, despite fears about the impact of Brexit and pre-election nerves on the economy - a report claims. 

In what’s been dubbed a ‘Brexit boom’, the average price of property coming to market in April 2017 rose by £3,547 to £313,666, up by 1.1 per cent on the previous month. The average asking price in March 2017 was £310,108.

The number of sales agreed this spring was the highest since 2007, before the credit crunch. Sales are up 10 per cent on spring 2016.